Afya II, Improving ART care adherence, A Cash Transfer and Food Assistance Program

This project tests the  increasingly recognized fact  that financial incentives  and food security can motivate behavior change and improve outcomes along the HIV care continuum.

This multiphased five years implementation research project tests these two concepts of providing food assistance and cash transfer to PLHIV in rural Tanzania.

The initial phases of the project has demonstrated that Short-term cash and food transfers both  promisingly increases  adherence and retention among food insecure treatment initiates compared to  nutritional assessment and Counseling which is the standard of care in Tanzanian context. Our initial learnings shows us that, interventions’ early benefits on retention are nearly maintained at 12 months, 6 months after the cash/food transfers have ended.

The project continue to follow up the beneficiaries using community based coordinators to track ong term benefits of the interventions

Sexual & Reproductive Health

Using a patient- centered design approach to facilitate a co designing process with end beneficiaries to address the drivers of poor adherence to ART treatment.

Discover Learning

A study led by an experienced Tanzanian researcher in partnership with University of California, Berkeley, John Hopkins University & Save the Children Tanzania.

Strategic Advisory Services

HPON has a pool of experts with commendable experience in Research, Monitoring, Learning and Evaluation of development programs in partnership with stakeholders

Maternal & Newborn Health

Tanzania faces a high rate of Maternal deaths (556 per 100,000 live births) that are potentially preventable. Rate of newborn deaths is still unacceptably high.